Hivos East Africa

East Africa

Sustainable Food

A recent report by the National Planning Authority in Uganda has revealed that the country is still among those where levels of hunger remain high (NPA, 2017). According to this report, the daily diet of Ugandans only comprises 1,860 calories instead of 2,200, which indicates the country may not attain Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) Two. SDG 2 commits countries to end hunger, achieve food security, improve nutrition and promote sustainable agriculture.

Today, most African youth seems uninterested in working in the coffee sector as they see it as an "old man's" hobby. However, the International Women’s Coffee Alliance (IWCA) states that it is women who form the majority of the world’s estimated total of 25 million coffee farmers.

Kabarole District situated in South Western Uganda is endowed with a rich climate and fertile soils. The district contributes large amounts of food not only for the Rwenzori region - where Kabarole is situated - but other regions and neighbouring countries such as Rwanda, Tanzania, Congo and Sudan. The irony, however, food and nutrition insecurity, diet related diseases such as stunting and malnutrition are common occurences in the district.

Did you know that the coffee in your cup has travelled a long way? As you smell the aroma and take a sip do you have thoughts of the diminishing food security?

Thirteen food and lifestyle entrepreneurs from Malawi, South Africa, Zambia and Zimbabwe pitched their business ideas in front of a four-panel jury, potential investors, NGOs and members of the public at Hivos Southern Africa HQ on June 16, 2017.

The role of fresh fruits and vegetables in nutrition is well recognized and in recent years, Kenyan consumers have increasingly embraced healthy diet options, therefore consuming more of fresh fruits and vegetables. Fruits and vegetables contain micronutrients, fibres and plant proteins which are important for daily diet, and therefore are integral to a diversified nutritious diet.

Last week, the world celebrated the International Women’s Day. While tremendous gains have been made economically, socially and politically in the last decade for women, a lot more still needs to be done. Take for example the role of women in food production. Over the weekend, The New Vision newspaper, Uganda, highlighted a story noting that women's lack of control, acquisition and ownership of land has incapacitated their ability to increase production in the agricultural sector.

One of the most celebrated United Nations events, the World Food Day was marked on the 16th of October this year. Even as we celebrated World Food Day to promote awareness and action against hunger, malnutrition and poverty; 1.5 million Kenyans are still starving.

This blog post is written by: